Sabbatical: This is how you say it

There are some items of language that people tend to struggle with. And sometimes they don't struggle, but still are unkowingly wrong. Let's shed some light on everyday mistakes in English. What's the proper way to say 1.5 h? (2013). Stupid as it sounds, the answer is not obvious. Is it one hour and a … Continue reading Sabbatical: This is how you say it

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Sabbatical: basic chemical compounds

After 8 years and over 350 posts, it’s a pity that my posts collect virtual dust at WordPress’s server. So this year I’m bringing back some of the best stuff, which doesn’t disagree with publishing new material. You may have noticed that I care about science and languages. I mean, it's in the title of … Continue reading Sabbatical: basic chemical compounds

Sabbatical: What’s with Saint George and Catalans?

After 8 years and over 350 posts, it's a pity that my posts collect virtual dust at WordPress's server. So this year I'll be bringing back some of the best stuff, which doesn't disagree with publishing new material. You may have noticed it's April. If you haven't, you'd better go to your doctor because it's … Continue reading Sabbatical: What’s with Saint George and Catalans?

Proper English on the Spanish radio? Not thanks to Maroon 5

If you ever listen to the Spanish radio, you’ll notice that their English is highly improvable. See some examples. When Spain couldn’t speak English—or even less than now—the average citizen settled for the pleasure of the melody, which they accompanied with a succession of sounds sort of inspired by the actual lyrics. That is, In the … Continue reading Proper English on the Spanish radio? Not thanks to Maroon 5

What’s your English dialect? Got words?

Today, I’m sharing with you three simple, short and even fun tests to test your dialect and your vocabulary in English. Which English? (5 min) English grammar is different around the world and influences of your own language—if it’s a different one—may show on your performance. This test consists of three parts. First you’re presented … Continue reading What’s your English dialect? Got words?

The ‘boringer’ case: a better rule for comparatives

No matter how hard teachers try, at some point a student is going to use boringer as a comparative and you’ll tell them it’s an exception. But what if you were wrong? The rule that teachers have taught for centuries is: 1 or 2-syllable adjective: adj.+er for comparatives, adj.+est for superlatives 3-syllable adjective or longer: … Continue reading The ‘boringer’ case: a better rule for comparatives